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The Beginning Of Wisdom January 13, 2007

Posted by rattazzimedia in Christianity, Church, God, Religion, Spiritual, Spiritual Overview, Spiritual Study, Spirituality, Theology.
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We might not use the word “wisdom” so much these days but we all want to think we know what’s going on.  We all want to think we know what is truly valuable in this world.  In other words we all want to have wisdom.  Often we seek for wisdom from those we admire.  If we respect someone for their wisdom we might attempt to learn form them or imitate them.  The best place to find wisdom though would be from one who has had the most experience dealing with the world or even better the one who created the whole thing would be a good source of wisdom.  The Bible endorses this line of thinking.  We read in the book of Proverbs:

The fear of the LORD is the beginning of wisdom,
and knowledge of the Holy One is understanding.

Most of the book of Proverbs was written by Solomon, King of Israel who asked God for wisdom to rule his people.  In Solomon’s writings he often contrasts the wisdom of the world or human based wisdom with the wisdom of God.  This is an important distinction to understand.  We should be seeking after God’s wisdom rather than mans wisdom.  Being in this world, we will naturally be more comfortable with the wisdom of this world, with man’s wisdom.  Christ came into this world to be a model for us of God’s wisdom. The apostle Paul explains to believers why he is taking so much time and effort attempting to reveal the wisdom of Jesus, he wrote in the letter to the Colossians: 

My purpose is that they may be encouraged in heart and united in love, so that they may have the full riches of complete understanding, in order that they may know the mystery of God, namely, Christ, in whom are hidden all the treasures of wisdom and knowledge.

Being in this world, the temptation always is to be primarily influenced by the wisdom and ways of this world.  Jesus came to demonstrate for us God’s wisdom but we must focus on Jesus to gain this wisdom.  We must read the Bible which tells us of Jesus and of God’s wisdom from the beginning.  Remembering that God in his wisdom has promised us eternal life and that there is no substitute for the wisdom of God.  So we must first understand that there is a difference between the wisdom of this world (the wisdom of man) and the wisdom of God.  Then we must focus on God’s wisdom in order to obtain what his wisdom has promised us.  Paul also wrote this to the Colossians:  

Since you died with Christ to the basic principles of this world, why, as though you still belonged to it, do you submit to its rules:  “Do not handle! Do not taste! Do not touch!”?  These are all destined to perish with use, because they are based on human commands and teachings.  Such regulations indeed have an appearance of wisdom , with their self-imposed worship, their false humility and their harsh treatment of the body, but they lack any value in restraining sensual indulgence.  Since, then, you have been raised with Christ, set your hearts on things above, where Christ is seated at the right hand of God.  Set your minds on things above, not on earthly things.

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Comments»

1. cumby - January 13, 2007

Thanks for your fine post.

The irony of Solomon’s writings in Proverbs and Ecclesiastes is that he helped to destroy his own kingdom by disobeying God. He got entangled with the false religions of his wives and showed himself to be quite foolish.

Replacing the word “wisdom” with “Jesus” makes reading Proverbs even more enjoyable.

Btw I too am a musician, guitar and keyboards. I have a 62 Gibson 12-string and a small recording setup in my basement, Roland/Boss 16-track. Praise and worship music. Am currently writing songs for a CD based on Revelation. Think King Crimson or Moody Blues with lyrics on the Apocalypse.

2. rattazzimedia - January 13, 2007

Solomon, despite his promising beginning and great wisdom, later in his life turned his heart away from God. This should be a warning to the rest of us. Thanks for your comment.


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